Self-Care for Survival.

In modern times, the term self-care has become ubiquitous with treating oneself. And while we can all agree that the occasional pampering is healthy and beneficial, for some it’s not merely an indulgence, but a daily struggle. For those with a chronic illness or disability, self-care can be the difference between life and death.

For someone who can barely get out of bed, the idea of doing a face-mask or taking a bubble bath seems inconceivable, exhausting and frankly, absurd. How can you run a marathon when you can’t walk a mile? When you’re in survival mode, self-care needs to be about taking tiny steps, not giant bounds.

In a 2003 essay, Christine Miserandino coined the term “spoon theory”. Spoon theory “is a disability metaphor…used to explain the reduced amount of mental and physical energy available for activities of living and productive tasks that may result from” having a disability, chronic illness, autoimmune disease, or mental illness. (wiki)

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Setting Intentions for an Abundant New Year.

Last year, I waxed poetic about whether New Year’s resolutions were doomed to fail.

This year, I want to suggest we throw out resolutions entirely.  Resolutions are so 2019; 2020 is all about Setting Your Intentions.

What’s the difference, you might ask?  Well, Intentions focus on the process, while Resolutions focus on the outcome. If we vow to run a marathon, but only manage a half-marathon, instead of feeling pride for the strides we’ve made, we feel let-down. This year, why not take joy in our accomplishments instead?

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New Years Resolutions: Are We Doomed To Fail?

Ahhh, the new year.  A time, when we all collectively rush out to buy gym memberships we will use for a month and pay for for the next eleven.  I’m completely guilty of rushing headlong into resolutions – like a bull charging a red cape.  And surprise! – that cape continually gets yanked out of reach – until even looking at the color red makes me feel guilty and annoyed.  Studies show that only 8% percent of people keep their resolutions, which begs the question: Are we doomed to fail?

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Ezekiel: A novel by John Fanning

Ezekiel Yusuf Moran is 99 years old. He has been many things in his near-century of life – a son, a farmer, a friend, a lover, a doctor, a husband, a father, a grandfather, a homeopath, a soldier and a French Résistance fighter. But most of all, Ezekiel has been a seeker. He seeks truth and the opportunity to speak his truth. He seeks communion – with his soul and spirit, with the natural world around him, with his friends and family. He seeks knowledge – from books, from people, from the world and from his own self.

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Dwelling in Discomfort

Look at the light through the windowpane. That means it’s noon, that means
         we’re inconsolable.
                               Tell me how all this, and love too, will ruin us.
These, our bodies, possessed by light.
                                                                Tell me we’ll never get used to it.

– Richard Siken, Scheherazade

***

We’re getting older.  We’ve had our hearts broken.  We’ve broken bones.  We’ve bet on the wrong horse or man or woman.  We made a poor investment along the way.  We lost something important.  We wasted time or money or energy on the wrong people.  We’re all a little more fragile now, a little more careful.  Curiosity is a trait we most associate with children or cats.

Not for us.

We tread the familiar paths.

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Would You Believe…Hanson?

In December of 2015, I’d just finished my 1-year teaching contract in Japan.  Hungry for adventure, I set off on a one-month sojourn along the eastern Australian coastline with a Scotswoman, a Frenchman and a Canberra-native in a Britz campervan.  (No, this isn’t the start of a joke).  There were all the usual road-trip high-jinks – forgetting to latch the kitchen drawers before hitting the highway, being delayed when our window was shattered by a ride-on mower at a rest stop, dodging the occasional kangaroo crossing the road, jamming the back door when we accidentally shut a sweater in it, battling plague-like proportions of flies and never ending sand, having our drying towels pooped on by a wombat.  You know – the usual things.  #justaustraliathings

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How to Stop Procrastinating. (Pt 2)

In the companion post to this one, I discussed the reasons we procrastinate, which was helpful in understanding the psychology behind our bad habits. In this post, I’ll provide tips on how to stop procrastinating.

If you missed part one, find it here: Why We Procrastinate (Pt 1)

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