Friday Photo Prompts

If you’re looking for writing inspiration, go no further. These ten images will get ideas percolating in no time. Let these strange and awe-inspiring landscapes from real life inspire your next project!

Source: baldeaglebluff
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It's Monday, What are you reading? #IMWAYR

It’s Monday! Borrowed this meme from Ali @ Our Book Boyfriends , who borrowed it from a long list of other bloggers. This meme is an opportunity to update everyone on what I read last week, what I’m reading now and what’s on the old TBR pile. And also, to connect with others in the book community.

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Girl's Guide to Surviving in a YA Dystopia

These are strange times and they’re only getting stranger. Luckily, I’ve read enough YA Dystopian novels over the years to be prepared. Here’s your comprehensive survival guide to getting through these tough times.

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How to Write a Novel Synopsis

How to Write a Novel Synopsis

There comes a time in every writer’s life where they’re asked to write a synopsis of their book. Not to be confused with sales copy (which is persuasive marketing to get readers to buy your book) the synopsis discloses a book’s entire narrative arc. It divulges to an agent or publisher what happens in your story, from start to finish. And it reveals all the twists and surprises that are held back from your reader. A synopsis needs to convince an agent or publisher that your premise is exciting and marketable. It assures them that character actions and motivations make sense. On the flip side, it can reveal plot flaws, lack of structure or hackneyed or cliched ideas.

The dreaded task of writing a synopsis is not fun or easy, but necessary. Most agents or publishers will ask for a synopsis (in addition to a query letter and manuscript sample) before considering taking on a book. Unfortunately, there is no one “right” way to write a synopsis, but the general consensus is that it should be 500-700 words, single-spaced. So how do you convey everything about your book in a modicum of space?

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Building an Online Presence as a Writer.

 There are many times in my career as a writer (and yes, I say career even though it’s generated no income for me yet) when I have felt like a fraud. Writers write.  It’s what they do.  Anyone with an open word document or a notebook and pen can claim to be a writer. But writers also publish. They reach an audience. They connect to people through their writing.   And while it’s all well and good to speak to you on my blog, what advice can an aspiring writer possibly hope to offer other writers? I don’t have an agent. I’m not published.  I’m not even self-published. But I’ll let you in on a secret – being published doesn’t make you a good writer.  Just as not being published doesn’t make you a bad writer.

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Self-Care for Survival.

In modern times, the term self-care has become ubiquitous with treating oneself. And while we can all agree that the occasional pampering is healthy and beneficial, for some it’s not merely an indulgence, but a daily struggle. For those with a chronic illness or disability, self-care can be the difference between life and death.

For someone who can barely get out of bed, the idea of doing a face-mask or taking a bubble bath seems inconceivable, exhausting and frankly, absurd. How can you run a marathon when you can’t walk a mile? When you’re in survival mode, self-care needs to be about taking tiny steps, not giant bounds.

In a 2003 essay, Christine Miserandino coined the term “spoon theory”. Spoon theory “is a disability metaphor…used to explain the reduced amount of mental and physical energy available for activities of living and productive tasks that may result from” having a disability, chronic illness, autoimmune disease, or mental illness. (wiki)

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Setting Intentions for an Abundant New Year.

Last year, I waxed poetic about whether New Year’s resolutions were doomed to fail.

This year, I want to suggest we throw out resolutions entirely.  Resolutions are so 2019; 2020 is all about Setting Your Intentions.

What’s the difference, you might ask?  Well, Intentions focus on the process, while Resolutions focus on the outcome. If we vow to run a marathon, but only manage a half-marathon, instead of feeling pride for the strides we’ve made, we feel let-down. This year, why not take joy in our accomplishments instead?

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