Breaking Bread

Yesterday, I logged into Facebook – something I rarely do anymore – and wondered if I’d accidently joined a Homesteader Group in my absence. Nearly every one on my Facebook wall was baking bread! And no, you didn’t read “Breaking Bad” wrong. It seems we’ve all collectively gone back in time, past the age of streaming television and straight into Little House on the Prairie.

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“Pandemic,” a Poem by Lynn Ungar — Steven Pressfield

With special thanks to our good friend Joe Jansen, who sent me this poem, and to the website Science and Nonduality where it appeared … here is “Pandemic” by San Francisco poet Lynn Ungar, http://www.lynnungar.com. Pandemic What if you thought of it as the Jews consider the Sabbath— the most sacred of times? […]

“Pandemic,” a Poem by Lynn Ungar — Steven Pressfield

It's Monday, What are you reading? #IMWAYR

It’s Monday! Borrowed this meme from Ali @ Our Book Boyfriends , who borrowed it from a long list of other bloggers. This meme is an opportunity to update everyone on what I read last week, what I’m reading now and what’s on the old TBR pile. And also, to connect with others in the book community.

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Ducks in the Trevi Fountain: What Covid-19 Can Teach Us About Life, Love and the World Around Us

Ducks in the trevvi fountain

We’ve all seen posts griping about long lines at the grocery store, hand-sanitizer and toilet paper shortages, resource hoarding and general lack of empathy and understanding. The news is no better. It’s a constant stream of anxiety-inducing updates on confirmed cases of COVID-19, death tolls, the plunging stock market and temporary closures or suspended services.

But perhaps the most surprising thing to come out of this – something the disaster movies missed the mark on – is the human ability to seek levity in the face of imminent disaster.

Warning: Long, picture-heavy post behind the cut.

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How to Write a Novel Synopsis

How to Write a Novel Synopsis

There comes a time in every writer’s life where they’re asked to write a synopsis of their book. Not to be confused with sales copy (which is persuasive marketing to get readers to buy your book) the synopsis discloses a book’s entire narrative arc. It divulges to an agent or publisher what happens in your story, from start to finish. And it reveals all the twists and surprises that are held back from your reader. A synopsis needs to convince an agent or publisher that your premise is exciting and marketable. It assures them that character actions and motivations make sense. On the flip side, it can reveal plot flaws, lack of structure or hackneyed or cliched ideas.

The dreaded task of writing a synopsis is not fun or easy, but necessary. Most agents or publishers will ask for a synopsis (in addition to a query letter and manuscript sample) before considering taking on a book. Unfortunately, there is no one “right” way to write a synopsis, but the general consensus is that it should be 500-700 words, single-spaced. So how do you convey everything about your book in a modicum of space?

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Building an Online Presence as a Writer.

 There are many times in my career as a writer (and yes, I say career even though it’s generated no income for me yet) when I have felt like a fraud. Writers write.  It’s what they do.  Anyone with an open word document or a notebook and pen can claim to be a writer. But writers also publish. They reach an audience. They connect to people through their writing.   And while it’s all well and good to speak to you on my blog, what advice can an aspiring writer possibly hope to offer other writers? I don’t have an agent. I’m not published.  I’m not even self-published. But I’ll let you in on a secret – being published doesn’t make you a good writer.  Just as not being published doesn’t make you a bad writer.

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Self-Care for Survival.

In modern times, the term self-care has become ubiquitous with treating oneself. And while we can all agree that the occasional pampering is healthy and beneficial, for some it’s not merely an indulgence, but a daily struggle. For those with a chronic illness or disability, self-care can be the difference between life and death.

For someone who can barely get out of bed, the idea of doing a face-mask or taking a bubble bath seems inconceivable, exhausting and frankly, absurd. How can you run a marathon when you can’t walk a mile? When you’re in survival mode, self-care needs to be about taking tiny steps, not giant bounds.

In a 2003 essay, Christine Miserandino coined the term “spoon theory”. Spoon theory “is a disability metaphor…used to explain the reduced amount of mental and physical energy available for activities of living and productive tasks that may result from” having a disability, chronic illness, autoimmune disease, or mental illness. (wiki)

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