Writing Rituals: Creating a Third Space.

Let’s cozy up together…and talk about…writing rituals.

You might ask yourself: what’s the difference between a ritual and a habit? Well, habits are things we do every day without thought – drinking water, brushing our teeth, tying our shoes. Through repetition, these tasks have become effortless. Unlike habits, rituals are not passive. Rituals require mindfulness. Rituals are a choice we make, over and over again.

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It’s Monday, What Are You Reading? #IMWAYR

Good morning! It’s Monday once more. I don’t blame you if you’re not keeping track. The days are seeping into one another, coloring each other like bleeding watercolor. I normally have to be up at 3:30 AM for my morning shifts, but I haven’t set an alarm in weeks. Trying to keep a routine has been challenging to say the least.

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Ducks in the Trevi Fountain: What Covid-19 Can Teach Us About Life, Love and the World Around Us

We’ve all seen posts griping about long lines at the grocery store, hand-sanitizer and toilet paper shortages, resource hoarding and general lack of empathy and understanding. The news is no better. It’s a constant stream of anxiety-inducing updates on confirmed cases of COVID-19, death tolls, the plunging stock market and temporary closures or suspended services.

But perhaps the most surprising thing to come out of this – something the disaster movies missed the mark on – is the human ability to seek levity in the face of imminent disaster.

Warning: Long, picture-heavy post behind the cut.

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Self-Care for Survival.

In modern times, the term self-care has become ubiquitous with treating oneself. And while we can all agree that the occasional pampering is healthy and beneficial, for some it’s not merely an indulgence, but a daily struggle. For those with a chronic illness or disability, self-care can be the difference between life and death.

For someone who can barely get out of bed, the idea of doing a face-mask or taking a bubble bath seems inconceivable, exhausting and frankly, absurd. How can you run a marathon when you can’t walk a mile? When you’re in survival mode, self-care needs to be about taking tiny steps, not giant bounds.

In a 2003 essay, Christine Miserandino coined the term “spoon theory”. Spoon theory “is a disability metaphor…used to explain the reduced amount of mental and physical energy available for activities of living and productive tasks that may result from” having a disability, chronic illness, autoimmune disease, or mental illness. (wiki)

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Setting Intentions for an Abundant New Year.

Last year, I waxed poetic about whether New Year’s resolutions were doomed to fail.

This year, I want to suggest we throw out resolutions entirely.  Resolutions are so 2019; 2020 is all about Setting Your Intentions.

What’s the difference, you might ask?  Well, Intentions focus on the process, while Resolutions focus on the outcome. If we vow to run a marathon, but only manage a half-marathon, instead of feeling pride for the strides we’ve made, we feel let-down. This year, why not take joy in our accomplishments instead?

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New Years Resolutions: Are We Doomed To Fail?

Ahhh, the new year.  A time, when we all collectively rush out to buy gym memberships we will use for a month and pay for for the next eleven.  I’m completely guilty of rushing headlong into resolutions – like a bull charging a red cape.  And surprise! – that cape continually gets yanked out of reach – until even looking at the color red makes me feel guilty and annoyed.  Studies show that only 8% percent of people keep their resolutions, which begs the question: Are we doomed to fail?

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